Living Rhetorically in the Real World A blog about freelancing, writing, editing, business & social media.

14May/100

Lifestyle Editing: Time for Yourself

There are some things that we just don't tend to "do", for the sake of social expectations. Singing or dancing down the street is generally considered "weird", for example. Talking to yourself- particularly if you haven't showered or slept in a couple days- is liable to cause skittish passers-by to give you a wide berth. Even going to a restaurant by yourself is thought of as unusual.

The question is, why? We have a barrier between that which is "acceptable" and that which is "unacceptable", but each of these are imaginary, made-up distinctions.

Society tells us to have three meals a day. Most "health experts" will suggest breaking those three meals down into six mini-meals throughout the day. Me, I like to eat nearly everything by 2 or 3pm. At this time, my body likes to eat most of my day's food in the morning. I sleep better when I eat more in the morning and just a small amount in the evening. Social structures, however, make this difficult: most people do not eat this way, and thus I need to adapt for social situations to accommodate for the majority. It makes dealing with an eating disorder very tricky indeed.

Some of the things that we're taught to do "because that's how it's done" are rather odd. Going to the movies, for example, is a social affair. It's common to get together with friends to see a movie that everyone's interested in. But... that seems odd. Unless you're going out for dinner or something similar before or after the movie, what happens is this: the group of friends gets together, piles into a car, and drives to the theatre (or they meet at the theatre). Pleasantries are exchanged as they stand in line for tickets and treats. Everyone takes their seats and watches the film. A couple hours later, the credits roll, and the group discusses their opinions on the movie for the next five or ten minutes before parting ways and going home.

As much fun as going to the movies can be, it doesn't exactly spark conversation, and it doesn't really count as "spending time with people". You can get away with sitting in silence next to the person you're with and only talking to them for ten minutes in total if you really want.

In defiance of society's expectations, and because the next time I see my friends I'd like to talk with them, tomorrow night I am going to the movies on a date with myself. Besides, there's only one other person I can imagine seeing Iron Man II in theatres with, and as the sistertraveller is currently in Sri Lanka, that means that I will go with myself instead. I'm also hoping that going to the movies will keep me awake for when the father dear's flight lands late at night from Cambodia- spending the day by myself and listening to what my body needs and wants, rather than following exactly what society dictates, sounds like a very pleasant experience.

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